Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Hi Sebastian, Thank you! It’s been awhile since I’ve made turkish delight, and, to be honest, I remember getting frustrated that even when using the same ingredients, I had things come out slightly differently each time. It is a bit of a finicky recipe. I remember some of my earlier batches were really only solid in the fridge. They were all edible, but weren’t the right consistency at room temperature like with the ones I bought in Turkey. Once you poured it into a mold, did yours thicken up again upon cooling? My batches always got thicker the longer I heated them, as the moisture evaporated, so I’m not really sure what happened with yours. From everything I’ve read, it seems to me that when making turkish delight to sell, they cook it at low heat for a long time. Perhaps differences in some of the ingredients may make a difference? (Certain corn starches may have fillers or something?) In any case, you’ve stumped me. The turkish delight relies on the two different mechanisms of thickening- 1. by the sugar being heated to a high enough texture to give it a chewy consistency, and 2. by the cornstarch thickening the liquid- making a softer, more rubbery (for lack of a better word) texture. To get the texture right, you have to find a delicate balance between the two. I wish I could be of more help.
titlis busy kitchen turkish delight 1

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Hi Maureen, I feel your pain after making the recipe again and again. I’ve since chatted with several other people who have done a lot of experimentation with trying to make Turkish delight, and we’ve come to the conclusion that it is a very finicky recipe which for some reason doesn’t always come out the same way even when you do things “exactly the same.” I chatted with one person who had tried so many methods and began trying with the addition of guar gum and other thickeners because he was pretty sure that they’re hiding things on the labels of the commercial stuff. The balance between the sugar being heated to a high enough texture to give it a chewy consistency (Without going so far as to caramelize it and change its flavor), and the cornstarch thickening the liquid- making a softer, more rubbery texture is very tricky to achieve, so I’m not sure how they make it commercially. I spent hours scouring the internet for information to try to find the key to the perfect Turkish delight every time, but, unfortunately, I can’t claim to have found it. I found a way to get something that was satisfactory to me, but it wasn’t perfect- Going back to yours, though… It sounds like your sugar mixture got too hot because the overall mixture shouldn’t get to hard ball stage, and it really shouldn’t brown. Caramelizing too far results in a different texture and a caramelized flavor like what you’d get when making flan. While it’s not a particularly unpleasant flavor, it masks the delicate rose flavor that you want with turkish delight. I’ve also since been told that not all corn starches are created equal, and that some have additives that can change the way they behave in these sorts of recipes. I haven’t had a chance to look into it, but that could be another potential area for variation. It’s been a long time since I’ve experimented with this, so maybe I’ll have to give it another shot. I’ve been considering trying with other flours and, perhaps, gelatins to try to get something with more consistent results and which, hopefully, would also be a tad healthier than the traditional version.
titlis busy kitchen turkish delight 2

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Instructions Prepare your molds. I used silicone molds greased with coconut oil. If you don’t have silicone pans, line other pans with greased wax or parchment paper. (The final candy will be sticky, and that will help with the unmolding process.) Begin by mixing together the first 3 ingredients (sugar, 3/4 c. water, and citric acid) in a heavy bottom pan, and bring to a slight boil before lowering the heat. Heat, without needing to stir, over low to medium heat until you reach 260ºF. You can occasionally use a spatula to wipe down any sugar crystals from the side of the pan throughout this process. Meanwhile, mix together the solution of cornstarch and water. When the sugar syrup has reached the right temperature, temporarily take it off the heat source and ladle in a bit of the sugar syrup into the cornstarch mixture to warm it. Slowly drizzle the cornstarch mixture into the sugar syrup while continuously stirring them together. Once all of the cornstarch solution has been completely incorporated, begin to stir the mixture over low heat. You will notice that the mixture should get quite thick almost immediately. Despite the fact that the mixture is quite thick, you will want to reduce and thicken it even more before adding in your flavorings. I found it was best to keep the mixture over a low heat so that the sugar wouldn’t caramelize on the bottom, affecting the flavor of the final product. As you heat and stir, you should notice that the gel becomes quite transparent. It will also reduce slightly in volume. To determine the point when you should add your flavoring, test the consistency of your candy by dipping a spoon into the gel, and then dipping the gel covered spoon into a glass of ice water. As the candy cools, you can judge the consistency and stop when you are happy with it. The longer you cook the candy at this stage, the chewier it will become and the more it will hold its shape at room temperature. Add in your flavorings and colorings. I wanted a strong rose flavor like the one in the turkish delight I bought in Turkey so I used a combination of 2 Tbsp. rose water, and 2 Tbsp. rose syrup. (In the first trials, I used only rose water, and it seemed to be enough for the softer versions of the candy. As you heat it more, though, the flavor gets more subtle, so I needed to add more flavor to compensate for that. You can check the flavor when you check the texture in ice water.) Once you’ve incorporated all of your flavorings, check the texture once more to make sure that the addition of any new liquids hasn’t affected the consistency of your candy too much. If necessary, slightly mix and warm your mixture a little longer at very low heat to help evaporate a little water, but be careful and take into account that doing this for too long can alter and diminish the flavorings you have added. When you are happy with your result, pour the mixture into your prepared molds and spread it out as best you can with a spatula. It should be very thick and sticky. Let cool for several hours. Cut into small squares, using cornstarch to keep the candies from sticking to one another. All of the recipes I found online either used powdered sugar or a combination of powdered sugar and cornstarch for dusting the candies, preventing them from sticking to one another. The turkish delight I bought in turkey was only dusted with cornstarch and wasn’t dusted with sugar, something I find to be unnecessary as the turkish delight is already very sweet. If you do choose to use powdered sugar for dusting, keep in mind that the candy may sweat and the sugar coating may end up “melting” off of the candy so you may have to add in more cornstarch or reapply the coating before serving your candy.
titlis busy kitchen turkish delight 3

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Prepare your molds. I used silicone molds greased with coconut oil. If you don’t have silicone pans, line other pans with greased wax or parchment paper. (The final candy will be sticky, and that will help with the unmolding process.) Begin by mixing together the first 3 ingredients (sugar, 3/4 c. water, and citric acid) in a heavy bottom pan, and bring to a slight boil before lowering the heat. Heat, without needing to stir, over low to medium heat until you reach 260ºF. You can occasionally use a spatula to wipe down any sugar crystals from the side of the pan throughout this process. Meanwhile, mix together the solution of cornstarch and water. When the sugar syrup has reached the right temperature, temporarily take it off the heat source and ladle in a bit of the sugar syrup into the cornstarch mixture to warm it. Slowly drizzle the cornstarch mixture into the sugar syrup while continuously stirring them together. Once all of the cornstarch solution has been completely incorporated, begin to stir the mixture over low heat. You will notice that the mixture should get quite thick almost immediately. Despite the fact that the mixture is quite thick, you will want to reduce and thicken it even more before adding in your flavorings. I found it was best to keep the mixture over a low heat so that the sugar wouldn’t caramelize on the bottom, affecting the flavor of the final product. As you heat and stir, you should notice that the gel becomes quite transparent. It will also reduce slightly in volume. To determine the point when you should add your flavoring, test the consistency of your candy by dipping a spoon into the gel, and then dipping the gel covered spoon into a glass of ice water. As the candy cools, you can judge the consistency and stop when you are happy with it. The longer you cook the candy at this stage, the chewier it will become and the more it will hold its shape at room temperature. Add in your flavorings and colorings. I wanted a strong rose flavor like the one in the turkish delight I bought in Turkey so I used a combination of 2 Tbsp. rose water, and 2 Tbsp. rose syrup. (In the first trials, I used only rose water, and it seemed to be enough for the softer versions of the candy. As you heat it more, though, the flavor gets more subtle, so I needed to add more flavor to compensate for that. You can check the flavor when you check the texture in ice water.) Once you’ve incorporated all of your flavorings, check the texture once more to make sure that the addition of any new liquids hasn’t affected the consistency of your candy too much. If necessary, slightly mix and warm your mixture a little longer at very low heat to help evaporate a little water, but be careful and take into account that doing this for too long can alter and diminish the flavorings you have added. When you are happy with your result, pour the mixture into your prepared molds and spread it out as best you can with a spatula. It should be very thick and sticky. Let cool for several hours. Cut into small squares, using cornstarch to keep the candies from sticking to one another. All of the recipes I found online either used powdered sugar or a combination of powdered sugar and cornstarch for dusting the candies, preventing them from sticking to one another. The turkish delight I bought in turkey was only dusted with cornstarch and wasn’t dusted with sugar, something I find to be unnecessary as the turkish delight is already very sweet. If you do choose to use powdered sugar for dusting, keep in mind that the candy may sweat and the sugar coating may end up “melting” off of the candy so you may have to add in more cornstarch or reapply the coating before serving your candy.

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight

Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight
Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight
Titlis Busy Kitchen Turkish Delight